Blocking Operation and Control

Summary

First, I made a blog titled Blocking Operation and Control, After this, I typed out headings. Summary, Terms and Concepts, Timeline, Project Skills and Evidence, and What I Learned. After this, I typed out the terms and concepts and wrote what we did for the timeline. Then, I did the storyboard with my partner Mike. I made a script in Celtx for our story. After that, I recorded audio of our script and edited it using multi cam in Premiere Pro. My brother also edited his copy of the video. I exported my video. After this, I posted my storyboard and script as well as my edited audio into my blog, and wrote about what I learned and what mistakes happened in the what I learned section. In this, we demonstrated examples of blocking.

Terms and Concepts

1: Block – determining where the actors will be on the set and the first camera position

2. Light – time for the DOP to light the set and position the camera for the first shot

3. Rehearse – camera rehearsal of the first set-up with the actors and crew

4. Adjustments – making lighting and other adjustments

5. Shoot – shooting the first scene (then repeat the process)

6: Movement – The actions made by the actor.

 

Blocking Positions

Body Positions

One quarter front position:  Body is turned a quarter away from the camera or audience either facing slightly left or right.

Profile Position:  The actor stands or sits facing either to the left or to the right allowing the camera or audience to see only one side of the face and body,

Full Front: The actor faces the audience or camera and is considered to be the strongest of the body positions. The full front position and the one-quarter front position (facing slightly to left or right) are labeled as open positions.

Full Back: Actor standing with his back to the camera or audience, usually for a brief period. This body position is usually used for dramatic effect.

Three-Quarter Back: The actor turns his body nearly full back to the camera or audience, either left or right so only one side of the head and shoulder is visible. It is the weakest of the five positions.

Three-Quarter Front: Same definition as one-quarter front.

Examples of strong movements are: rising from a chair, straightening up, placing weight on the forward foot, raising the arm, or walking forward. Examples of weak movements are: Stepping backward, slouching, placing the weight on the rear foot, sitting down, lowering the arm, walking backward, or turning around and walking away from a figure or object.

Examples of strong and powerful attitudes are:

Confident, direct, controlled, active role, good eye focus and control, definite goals or wants, aggressive, assertive, strong speech patterns, concise movement, firm, stands ground, good self-image, relaxed, dominate, independent, resilient, self-sufficient, wanting something, control over life’s choices, emotions open, changing for the better, growing, sincere.

Examples of weak attitudes are:

Uncertain, lacking confidence, hesitant, not in control, reactionary, unsure or second thoughts about goals, emotionally tense, submissive, intimidated, evasive eyes, suffering in pain, masking or hiding emotions, giving ground–retreating, reliant, needing something, indecisive, fragile, static, regressing, little or no control over life’s choices.

Stage Orientation and Emphasis: The area and direction on the stage that actors are sent to. They are in the order of up right, down right, up center, down center, up left, and down left. Actors use emphasis to add more strength or weakness when they do a movement.

Timeline

  • 1: Day One: Storyboard/planning May be absent for 3 periods due to a dentists appointment 11/15/18. Absent, but worked and finished it yesterday.
  • 2 Day Two: Film a team.
  • 3: Day Three: Be filmed.
  • 4: Day Four: Begin editing.
  • 5: Day Five: Finish editing.
  • 6: Day Six: Finish and publish blog post.

Project Skills Evidence

I made my storyboard in class. After this, I made my script in Celtx. I later put them into my blog. After that, I made a video of me and my brother doing our script and posted it into our blog. We had done five different takes before we had our different recordings and videos finalized. Our script was about a comedy routine on a thief who stole a ham sandwich and his interaction with the judge. I played the thief, named Mayson Orwell, alias, Mayo. My brother played the judge and narrator of the story.

 

Script

  

What I Learned

When a first time director steps on a set, blocking a scene can be one of the most frustrating and terrifying parts of their job. I learned how to use multi cam on Adobe Premiere Pro. I also learned how to do proper cuts between scenes and cameras. A problem I had was that I had trouble with the multi cam setup. I fixed this by letting Mom record using my phone and Dad record using Mike’s phone at the same time. Then, I put it together in Premiere Pro using the source selection sequence. Another problem I had was that I did 5 different takes due to messing up my script. I fixed this by printing out my script and reading my lines off of it, then I fixed the errors in Adobe Premiere Pro. I followed this tutorial.

Five Stages Of Blocking A Scene

 

1. Having a shot list will help you during the blocking process. The shot list is like a map: it gives you a path to your destination but you don’t always have to follow it

2. Let the actors show you what they want to do first, then, when you make a suggestion, it is based on something you have already seen

3. Where the camera is placed is determined primarily by what is important in the scene.

4. Blocking is like a puzzle: directors need to keep working at it until the whole scene works.

5. In Television and low budget films, speed is essential, story and block some scenes so that your action takes place in one direction (to avoid turning the camera around for reverses.)

Tips for Blocking

Blocking should make the dramatic or comedic purpose of the scene so clearly apparent to the viewer that even a deaf man could understand it.

Blocking is the positioning and movement of the characters to tell the story in visual terms. This placement can suggest the attitudes of the characters toward one another so the story situation is conveyed to the audience with or without dialogue. It makes the audience understand, at times contrary to the dialogue, the inner meaning existing within and between characters.

Movement and physical behavior.

Examples of strong movements are: rising from a chair, straightening up, placing weight on the forward foot, raising the arm, or walking forward. Examples of weak movements are: Stepping backward, slouching, placing the weight on the rear foot, sitting down, lowering the arm, walking backward, or turning around and walking away from a figure or object.

Examples of strong and powerful attitudes are:

Confident, direct, controlled, active role, good eye focus and control, definite goals or wants, aggressive, assertive, strong speech patterns, concise movement, firm, stands ground, good self-image, relaxed, dominate, independent, resilient, self-sufficient, wanting something, control over life’s choices, emotions open, changing for the better, growing, sincere.

Examples of weak attitudes are:

Uncertain, lacking confidence, hesitant, not in control, reactionary, unsure or second thoughts about goals, emotionally tense, submissive, intimidated, evasive eyes, suffering in pain, masking or hiding emotions, giving ground–retreating, reliant, needing something, indecisive, fragile, static, regressing, little or no control over life’s choices.

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